Kirigami inspired Anti-Slip Shoe sole

Mimicking snakeskin as a referencing purpose, the material boosts friction which is the best option for coating very cheap of your shoes for a stronger grip on ice and alternative slippery surfaces.

 

A shoe sole is developed by MIT engineers which is inspired by kirigami a type of origami that involves cutting paper also as folding it to design a grip of the shoe which will increase friction between the shoe and the ground. Mimicking snakeskin as a referencing purpose, this material boosts friction which is the best option for coating very cheap of your shoes for a stronger grip on ice and alternative slippery surfaces.

 

 

Giovanni traverse who is an Associate Professor in MIT and a physician at Brigham women’s hospital, Associate Prof at Harvard medical school and Katia Bertoldi working as a professor of applied mechanics at Harvard University together created this helpful grips may help to cut back the chance of falling in icy and alternative unsafe surfaces among elderly.

 

 

Giovanni Traverso stated that this kirigami-based work is intended to deal with the challenge of preventing falling on ice and other slippery surfaces by developing a sole in the thought of increasing friction with a surface. This is achieved due to the complex patterns of spikes created on a sheet of metal or plastic. These sheets, pasted on to the shoe sole and stay flat when the user is standing, however the spikes popup at the time of the movement of walking.

 

 

Babaee says that the freshness of this kind of surface is that we've a form transition from a 2D flat surface to a 3D structure with spikes that pop out.  The wearer will feel the grippyness after the anti-slipping sole is attached with a conventional shoe sole. Thus, sharp needles will get in and out depends on the stretch that you give on it.

 

 

On these early days, the Kirigami technique was widely used to produce new materials such as bandage that has the flexibility to stay to extremely deformable regions of the body, just like elbow and knee, and maintain its holds even after folding and releasing it for 100 times. It is conjointly been used on sensor skin to give input for soft robots to make a plan with touch and small places.

 

India

29 Views